5 Graduate Level Careers if You Want to Work Outside

5 Graduate Level Careers if You Want to Work Outside

 

If you are interested in science, you may wish to pursue a career in one of the biological science fields. This type of work generally requires a Ph.D. if you want to conduct independent research. There are several careers available in this field. If you are interested in studying and recovering artifacts, you may want to consider a career in archaeology. If you want to work outside, careers in these fields will allow you the chance to do just that. Field studies are a must in this area, so you might even get to visit some exotic locations over the course of your career.

1. Archaeology

A career in archaeology begins with a graduate degree in social sciences. Archaeologists are responsible for the recovery and examination of material artifacts. These can include tools, pieces of pottery, or even building ruins from ancient human cultures. They use these items to learn about what life was like in a given culture. A lot of this work is done in a lab, but you also have the opportunity to go on archaeological digs. Some of these business trips could take you to places you have only dreamed of!

2. Botany

Although most biological scientists spend most of their work time in a lab, some do get out and do field studies. Botanists fall into this group in their study of plant life. Field studies could involve strenuous activity for extended periods of time, but botanists in the field usually are not exposed to dangerous conditions. If you enjoy working with plants or learning about their biochemical processes, this career may be for you. You will get to work with all types of plants, including algae, mosses, ferns, flowering plants, and even fungi.

3. Zoology

Zoologists can also spend time in the outdoors doing field studies on animals. All types of wildlife are within a zoologist's scope. Some researchers study animals in their environments, and these are the ones that get to work outdoors the most. You can even specialize and study one particular type of animal if you prefer. For example, mammalogists study mammals, herpetologists study reptiles, and ornithologists study birds.

4. Ecology

An ecologist is responsible for the study of organisms' relationships with each other, as well as their relationship with their surrounding environment. They also conduct field studies in the outdoors in order to learn how population size affects an ecosystem, as well as the levels of rainfall. They also study the effects of pollution and temperature to get an idea of how these factors influence the environment in a given ecosystem. A career as an ecologist would allow you to have plenty of time outside while on the job.

5. Agricultural Science

An agricultural scientist is responsible for studying farm crops and animals so they can improve both their quality and quantity. Their job is to find ways to conserve water and soil as much as possible, as well as ways to control weeds and pests more safely and effectively. Scientists who specialize in studying soil and crops spend a great deal of their time outside conducting research.

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