Masters in Anthropology

Masters in Anthropology

To earn a Masters in Anthropology, you are generally required to take 30 semester hours total plus a six-credit hour thesis. Elective courses should come from certain areas of study, including cultural, physical, and forensic anthropology, archaeology, and iconography. There are several different categories you could specialize in with this major, including each of these titles above. When specializing in cultural anthropology, proficiency in a foreign language is required. Your thesis will consist of original research carried out under the supervision of an advisor from the major.

If you are looking for a convenient way to earn your anthropology degree, finding an accredited program online could be the perfect option for you. Many students seeking master’s degrees hold full-time jobs and possibly have families to support. It would be impossible for a person with this kind of schedule to fit traditionally-scheduled classes into their busy day. However, when you study online, you complete courses at your own pace at the time of day that works best for you.

There are certain non-academic careers that are only available to students who earn a high enough degree. These include foreign affairs, international business and development, primatology, forensic anthropology, world health services and cultural resource management. Physical anthropology in particular leads to many fascinating career possibilities, including those within the forensic sciences like criminal justice and working at the coroner’s office. There are far too many factors to define a decided annual salary of students who complete Anthropology Master’s Programs, including location of the job, previous experience, type of employer and category of anthropology the work falls into. However, a survey taken in 2005 showed that many who earned a bachelor’s degree made $25,000 to $30,500 per year while master’s degree earners could expect to make up to $37,400 annually.