Masters in Archaeology

Masters in Archaeology

Archaeology is the study of our past as humans and the imprint we have placed on the landscape. When entering a Masters in Archaeology program, you are required to have already completed an undergraduate study program in a similar field. By furthering your education, you will further your understanding of conserving artifacts and architecture, preserving work sites and managing projects. After completing two to five years of study after your undergraduate degree, and completing an original thesis, you will be where you need to be to earn your master’s degree. You may take field methods classes, a materials analysis course, and lessons on conservation and preservation.

In order to benefit the most from the hands-on experience needed to complete Archaeology Master’s Programs, it is recommended that a majority of courses be taken in the classroom rather than online. Campus-based study in this field provides the proper training and practical experience you need to succeed in the field of archaeology following graduation. There may be a few courses you can take online, but indeed, most should be campus-based.

In the United States, you need a master’s degree to be eligible to become a professional archaeologist with any agency in the country. You might seek a career working in the field of archaeology in countries all over the world. You could also become a professor on the subject. Other than that, other widely-varying options include becoming an artifact illustrator, field or lab supervisor, field or GIS or technician, historian, or public archaeologist. Since there is a wide diversity in the public and private sectors and type of work to be done in the field, wages of archaeologists vary highly. The mean annual salary overall, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, is a little over $57,000.