Masters in Teaching Scholarships and Fellowships

Masters in Teaching Scholarships and Fellowships

MAT Scholarships and Fellowships

There are some scholarship, fellowship and loan forgiveness programs available to teaching candidates today that are not found for other professional degrees. The federal government has been active in trying to draw new people into the teaching profession, both students coming out of college and mid-career professionals who might be interested in making a change. Many of the scholarship opportunities that are available to students based on their academic area of focus are funded by a national organization, corporation or trust, and administered by individual schools. In some cases the university nominates candidates for scholarships or fellowships. So it is always good to check the scholarship database at your school to see what might be available for funding your Master of Arts in Teaching degree program.

  1. The Stafford Loan Forgiveness Program for Teachers is offered by the U.S. Department of Education as an option for teachers who, upon completing their degree, work for five years in an elementary or secondary school designated as a facility that provides service to low income families, and that meets certain other qualifications. There are varying qualifications for the amount of loan offset available; if you are teaching mathematics or a science at the high school level the government may forgive up to $17,500 owed on a federal student loan or on a direct loan.
  2. AFCEA Scholarship Program is underwritten by the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association, a non-profit organization formed by defense contractors as a professional association. The organization awards $5,000 annually to thirty five applicants who are enrolled in a teaching program that will lead to a career in one of the four STEM academic areas: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. A MAT student who is specializing in one of these areas is eligible, as are undergraduate students seeking a bachelor's degree in one of the relevant academic areas.
  3. TEACH Grants is another program authorized by Congress and administered by the U.S. Department of Education. The term is an acronym for Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education, a grant program for students who are willing to teach for four years in a school serving low income children and teach in what is defined as a high need area. The grants are for $4,000 per year and may be applied to an undergraduate or graduate teaching degree. The academic areas that are classified as high need include bilingual education, foreign language, mathematics, reading specialist, science, and special education.
  4. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation has several fellowship opportunities for teaching students. There is a state based program, currently operative in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana, which is designed to bring STEM teachers to low income school districts and areas where there is a shortage of math and science teachers. The Foundation also operates the Lenore Annenberg Teaching Fellowship for current students or career changers who are willing to teach in high need or rural areas. And there is the Woodrow Wilson - Rockefeller Brothers Fund Fellowships for minority students who are pursuing teaching degrees.
  5. Knowles Science Teaching Foundation offers a remarkable fellowship for students who are committed to teaching science or mathematics in a U.S. high school. The fellowship program covers tuition, provides a monthly stipend, and includes grants for educational materials. A Knowles Fellowship is worth nearly $150,000 over a five year period.
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