MBA School Rankings

MBA School Rankings

MBA School Rankings

There is probably no other graduate degree for which the college carries more importance. The ambitious graduates flooding the investment banks these days wear their alumnus status like a badge, and to some degree it matters because of the networking effect. MBA graduates from a particular school will interview a fellow alumnus first, all things being equal. But for the other ninety five percent of MBA graduates, the degree and the work put into it should provide a good launching pad for entry into the business world. The schools listed here are drawn from the ranks of the top MBA programs as identified by US News and World Report in their annual survey of U.S. universities and graduate schools. We have listed the programs among the top 20 or so that are a little more affordable and a lot more accessible than the most revered of American universities that consistently top the ratings charts.

  1. Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management is ranked fourth among the country's business schools, with a MBA program that is available as a two year, full time program, a part time program, an Executive MBA, and an accelerated one year degree. Kellogg offers no less than nineteen areas of specialization including some unusual options such as Analytical Finance, Media Management, and Social Enterprise at Kellogg (SEEK) which is a program focused on the management of non-profit and government agencies involved in social change on a global basis.
  2. University of California at Berkeley has an interesting array of focal areas built into the MBA program. Students may opt for the traditional areas of specialization which include Global Management, Health Management, Entrepreneurship, Technology, and Real Estate. These are all certificate programs that can be added on to the core MBA degree. IN addition there are three areas of special interest offered as a series of electives; these include Corporate Social Responsibility, Energy & Clean Technology, and Nonprofit & Public Leadership.
  3. New York University Stern School of Business offers a full time MBA program is augmented by a part time option and by a 22 month Executive MBA program designed for working professionals with at least seven years' business experience. The areas of concentration available with the Stern MBA reflect the increasing complexity and specialization in the finance world. Among the 22 options are Finance, Corporate Finance, Financial Instruments & Markets, Financial Systems & Analytics, and Quantitative Finance.
  4. University of Michigan takes a different approach to the curriculum for the MBA than most schools of business. There is no list of majors or areas of concentration. Instead, students are encouraged to select elective courses based on career goals. The school helps to identify industry-specific course work that aligns with required career skills. Thus students are directed to a roster of functional/industry overviews on topics such as Equity Research, Health Care, Venture Capital, Investment Banking, Consulting, and several others.
  5. Columbia University puts the teamwork concept to work immediately in the MBA program. Students are assigned to a cluster of 60-65 students who take most of the first year core classes together. The group is assembled with representation from students who have come from across the globe, creating a de facto working group for the initial year. The areas of concentration available with this degree include fifteen options, among them Entrepreneurship, Private Equity, Media, International Business, and Healthcare & Pharmaceutical Management.
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